Monday, November 07, 2011

VanBC Day 3: The Play is the Thing

(Actually, tourist day was Day 4. Sorry for the confusion.)

I am not sure there is a name for the phenomenon, but most working people who are bustling all day, then attending various activities at night for months on end wind up experiencing a singular sensation once the wheels of life pause for a bit. The sensation is fatigue and the response is sleep. For us, this was the day.

We had our fruit and pastry breakfast in our room (saved money!) and prepared for more fun on Granville Island! After some low speed web surfing and light reading (including rule books for OSRIC role playing games), we headed off to the island once again.

There are two services that compete to provide ferry service between Granville Island and various points crossing False Creek. (False Creek is an inlet off of English Bay that separates downtown Vancouver from the rest of the city.) On this trip we wound up using False Creek Ferries for all of our travels. Their competitor is Aquabus and their boats are brightly colored (the last picture of Day 2 morning shows this). The interesting part of this story is that the two companies formed within a decade of one another and the founder of Aquabus is the son of the former partner of False Creek Ferries. I sense some drama here, though Wikipedia lacks some of the juicy details, it gives a few hints.

(For those sea-faring readers, some of the craft we boarded were probably designed and commissioned by the Benford Design Group. The "spec" PDF for the ferries we took can be found here. It is quite interesting.)

Here is a False Creek ferry:


Another picture looking westward just because:


We bought lunch from food stands at the Granville market and settled down outside under a covered area to eat. The food was unremarkable but edible. The doves, pigeons, and seagulls were plentiful and rather aggressive. It took a fair amount of shooing to keep them at bay. Some dumb lady thought it would be amusing to throw a hand full of seed into the middle of the tables and, of course, the birds went crazy flying and crashing to get at the food and making everyone cover their food. I guess she didn't give a damn about public health and what diseases birds transmit...well, her smirk told me that.

Away from the human consumption of food, the conflagration of birds was more interesting and, for one little girl, completely welcome.


We wandered around looking at shops and museums while we waited for the doors to open at The Arts Club for a local play we bought tickets for.

The native art from the Haida, Salish, and other people was on display in many places...



After our walking tour of the island, we arrived at the Granville Stage of The Arts Club theater company and gained admittance to the production of the day:


Here is the blurb from the website describing the play, Circle Mirror Transformation - A Comedy of Secrets:

When Marty gathers four locals for the first ever drama class in a small Vermont town, she has no idea how an injection of hula-hooping and wacky acting games will come to change their lives—including, most unexpectedly, her own..

It took me about 10 minutes to warm up to the plot and characters but was glad I did. It was an interesting look at how people behave towards each other in a public setting and how relationships can form and dissolve between people. I think the acting crew achieved the 3 E's (entertain, educate, and elevate) fairly well.

After the play, we adjourned to the adjoining food establishment and decided to try a signature Canadian dish known as poutine:


As you can see, it was french fries covered in brown gravy and accompanied by cheese curds. It was good, but not great. I suspect that I permanently gained the weight of whatever I ate from that dish...sigh.

We walked around a bit more, then returned to the Sand Bar for dinner. You may recall we had lunch there earlier in the trip, but I digress.

I ordered Hamachi Nigiri (yellow fin tuna on a bed of rice) and something called a Canadian Roll:


Sadly, I can't remember precisely what was in the Canadian Roll other than salmon, a couple other seafood items, and some green onion and other vegetable items. Maybe you can figure it out from the close up...I don't know. It was tasty. I do remember that. I also ordered a wok fried squid dish which was enjoyable as well:


Ladybug ordered a roast chicken dish. She enjoyed it, though the chicken was a bit on the dry side. They also could have thrown in a few more vegetables but I guess you can't win them all.


We shared a very tasty lemon tart for dessert.


As we departed the island, we bid adieu to the theater building.


We also passed by a visually appealing set of house boats.


We spent the rest of the evening unwinding and preparing for our tourist adventure!

4 comments:

The Moody Minstrel said...

It's interesting how, throughout your description of your trip so far, everything has seemed to be a battle of color vs. gray. Even the row of houseboats was an island of color surrounded by gray.

(Waiting for an obvious response with shallow breath...)

Pandabonium said...

"Way cool." The design info on the ferries is really neat.

The woodcarvings look good. Reminds me of the Ainu people in Japan.

The play sounds good. Audience participation with hula hoops would be even better! ;^)

Your dinner at the Sand Bar looks wonderful. Yum.

Houseboats. It didn't occur to me that those houses were afloat. Nice.

Don Snabulus said...

MM,

I wrote the obvious response right here (magnify as needed)-> .

The weather certainly contributed to the grayness, but it was preferable to the drenching Portland was receiving at the time.

PB,

I thought you might enjoy some marine geekspeak. It was thanks to you that we started taking photos of our food. Why we started with poutine is anyone's guess.

Doc Häagen-Dazs said...

Looking at those house boats... I could never visit or vacation there, because I would always know I'd have to leave...