Wednesday, September 29, 2004

Oh, Come On! What's One Little Spider?

The speckled brown exotic creature — as big as a man’s palm — crawled from a set of drums brought in from Senegal for a music workshop.

Heck, I have spiders that size in my classroom every once in a while. It's funny to watch the students' reactions to them, though it's not particularly funny to have one crawl up your pantleg. Even so, I've never heard of anyone being bitten by one.

We have had people bitten by our eight-in-long centipedes, however. THOSE are brutal. Talk about a bite causing a "nasty reaction"!

Those huge spiders and huge centipedes only seem to be numerous in the area where my school is located, atop a hill overlooking Kashima Shrine and formerly a part of the shrine's precinct. When they excavated the area for my school to be built, they uncovered the remains of a village that was there more than 5,000 years ago.

Is it a curse?

14 comments:

ladybug said...

Musings from Newberg-an old guy my mom knows says the spiders are spinning weird webs, the kind only seen later in the year, and only if there is going to be a hard winter. He used to work the orchards for years near Wenatchee. Rumors from Portland- We and the neighbors have noticed it's been a "Spider Year", there seems to be tons of them around, (more than normal), and they seem to be quite big an fat!

DewKid said...

... and here in Temecula CA, the ants and spiders which typically overrun us over the summer are mysteriously absent. In fact, the only insects I've seen are flies, West-Nile laden mosquitoes, and moths. Oh, and a praying mantis.

Guess all the spiders are hightailing it to the Pacific Northwest for some skiing, wind-surfing, and visits to the infamous Powell's Bookstore.

Anonymous said...

A Spider:

You said it!

Vulgarius said...

So...Ummm....What happened to the village?



Lately I have had to evict several mouse sized wolf spiders. I guess thats what you get for refusing to use poisons save for the Mint oil Yellow jacket medicine. That stuff rocks!

Vulgarius said...

So...Ummm....What happened to the village?



Lately I have had to evict several mouse sized wolf spiders. I guess thats what you get for refusing to use poisons save for the Mint oil Yellow jacket medicine. That stuff rocks!

Anonymous said...

We've got wolf-sized mouse spiders made of meat and unlikely ballot measure signs.

Vulgarius said...

MMMBARRFFF!!!!!!!

Vulgarius said...

Or was that wolf sized MEAT! spiders?

Don Snabulus said...

The Meat Spiders will be headlining with the Unlikely Yard Signs at the Aladdin on Friday at 6pm...

...and don't forget on Saturday, we have the big show with Jersey Cow  at 8pm.

The Moody Minstrel said...

Okay, we have mmmMEAT Spiders. We also have nice and mmmMEATy Jersey Cows. Tell me; are the Yard Signs Unlikely because they are made of mmmMEAT, as well?


(I really hate this *@%#$ diet...)

The Moody Minstrel said...

To answer your comment about the village, well, that's a good question. They aren't sure how much of this is historical fact and how much is only legend, but the chronicles state that Kashima Shrine was established by Emperor Jimmu (the first Yamato emporer, who may or may not have really existed) in the 4th century b.c.(e.) or thereabouts. Up till then, this area was the southernmost reach of the Ainu nation. It is known that, at about that time, a great and very bloody war was fought between the Yamato and the Ainu over in what is now the city of Itako (hence the name, Itako, which actually meant "Place of Pain" in archaic Japanese). The Yamato won, and Kashima Shrine was established soon afterward. The reasons it was chosen are obvious; not only was it the highest hill overlooking the valley where the war was fought, but it was an island (actually a very narrow peninsula) that was very densely forested. It also has many features that range from interesting to f***ing bizarre.
Anyway, they don't know for sure who lived in the village, but the pottery fragments and stone tools we have in the school's museum date from 8,000 b.c.(e.) to 4,000 b.c.(e.), meaning they were either Ainu or the Jomon Era Japanese, whose origins (and fate) are uncertain (possibly either Mongolian or Polynesian. The later Yayoi people, the ancestors of the Yamato, migrated from Korea..though few here would like to admit it).

Okay, you can wake up now.

Anonymous said...

B***Head:

He he. He he. You said f***ing. He he.

Vulgarius said...

I was affraid you were going to say that they put up the wrong lawn signs!


Emperor: "The peasants are revolting! Unleash the meat spiders!"

The Moody Minstrel said...

More like:

Emperor: "The Ainu are revolting...because they don't acknowledge me as a god! Kill them all! Scatter their bodies across the Kanto Plain!"

The Ainu still exist, but now they are a very small (and not very well treated) minority that live only in the northernmost tip of Honshu and Hokkaido. They are pretty much the Japanese Indians...except they got driven off their lands more than 2000 years ago.